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Patti Murin suspects she may be among the over 400,000 Americans who have contracted coronavirus.

The Broadway star and Chicago Med alum — who is pregnant, expecting her first child with husband Colin Donnell at the end of July — revealed on social media Thursday that she likely has COVID-19.

She came to the conclusion after experiencing a sea of the virus’ symptoms including tiredness, body aches, a fever, and “and a cough that makes it feel like my head is splitting open from the inside out.”

Consulting via video chat with her OB/GYN, her general practitioner and a doctor at Mt. Sinai, Murin said she was told it was “pretty certain” she has the illness, though that she wouldn’t be able to be tested unless her symptoms worsened.

“I can’t get tested unless I start having trouble breathing, so I’m going to count my lucky stars that I seem to be leaning towards the mild end of the scale,” Murin, 39, explained. “And sure, while it would be nice to know if I’m positive or not, I’m not willing to walk into a waiting room and possibly get other people sick just for my own selfish informational purposes.”

“Recovery plan for me is the same either way: sleep, tons of fluids, and Tylenol,” she said.

The actress, known for originating the role of Princess Anna in the stage adaptation of Disney’s Frozen, also assured fans that she’s been told her baby on the way is staying healthy during all of this.

“I AM FINE, I SWEAR, AND SO IS THE BABY!” Murin stressed. “This virus can’t cross the placenta, so my uterus is literally the safest place for little peanut right now. I’m eating and drinking all the water in the world, and she’s kicking me almost hourly now, so I know she’s growing stronger by the day.”

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Murin went on to say that she’s remaining in her upstate home with O’Donnell and their two dogs, where they have been social distancing since March.

“Laughing makes me cough, which sucks, but smiling makes me happy, and my friends and family are helping me do just that and staying in contact as much as they can,” said Murin.

O’Donnell, 37 — who played the fictional Dr. Connor Rhodes on Chicago Med — has been a particular help.

“Colin is taking excellent care of me,” Murin raved. “His TV doctor experience combined with his huge heart and love for me make for the best partner I could ask for, for this moment and for forever. And he’s feeling fine and staying an appropriate distance away!”

“Also, Petey and Milo haven’t left my side, so I’m surrounded with love and healing energy on all sides,” she added of her two dogs.

Patti Murin and Colin Donnell Expecting First Child — a Baby Girl: ‘We’re Overwhelmingly Happy’

Her message ended with a plea that fans continue to focus on those in need and praise those taking care of everyone during the crisis.

“I’m so lucky. There are so many others who are not,” Murin said. “Please keep turning your attention to them, and to the essential workers and the insanely brave and strong medical personnel, and to the people who are stocking your grocery shelves and delivering your food.”

“The world is crazy right now, but this is not forever. Remember that,” she said. “Love to all!”

PEOPLE broke the news back in February that Murin and O’Donnell are expanding their family. The couple will be married for five years this coming June.

Since then, Murin has been sharing updates about her pregnancy on social media, including photos of her baby bump. She’s about 10 days away from hitting the 6-month mark.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. To help provide doctors and nurses on the front lines with life-saving medical resources, donate to Direct Relief here.

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