Breathing in polluted air could potentially contribute to brain disorders, warns new study

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The dirtier the air, the more toxins are entering the lungs when someone breathes.

What someone breathes can have an impact on their health.

So too can where someone lives judging by the results of a new study by the University of Birmingham.

Researchers have found breathing in polluted air could lead to toxic particles being transported from the lungs to the brain.

The study revealed a new direct pathway used by inhaled fine particles taking them from the lungs to the brain.

Furthermore, the research suggests these particles could stay for longer in the brain than in other organs.

As a result, it is thought these particulates could increase the risk of neurological disorders.

Findings from the study also highlight the dangers of living in areas of high pollution.

Presenting their research, co-author of the study Professor Iseult Lynch said: “The data suggests that up to eight times the number of fine particles may reach the brain by travelling, via the bloodstream, from the lungs than pass directly via the nose – adding new evidence on the relationship between air pollution and detrimental effects of such particles on the brain.”

Professor Lynch added: “The data suggests that up to eight times the number of fine particles may reach the brain by travelling from the lungs than pass directly via the nose – adding new evidence on the relationship between air pollution and detrimental effects of such particles on the brain.”

Data from the University of Birmingham’s research add to a growing body of research linking air pollution to neurological harms, including dementia.

Dementia is the United Kingdom’s biggest killer; every year 67,000 families will lose a loved one to the condition.

While the world has known about dementia for over 100 years now, the scientific community is still not in touch with a cure.

Some treatments are effective, but few can significantly stem the tidal wave of damage inflicted by the disease.

Despite this, scientists are beginning to understand how dementia can be prevented as well as treated.

Lifestyle factors are considered a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s and other forms of brain disorders.

These include the impact of diet and social isolation.

The concern is those living in areas of high pollution could face a greater risk of Alzheimer’s or other neurological diseases later in life.

Alzheimer’s remains the most common form of dementia in the UK.

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